About Angels

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Angels are messengers of God in the Hebrew Bible (translating מלאך), the New Testament and the Quran. The term “angel” has also been expanded to various notions of spiritual beings found in many other religious traditions. Other roles of angels include protecting and guiding human beings, and carrying out God’s tasks. The theological study of angels is known as angelology. In art, angels are often depicted with wings, ultimately reflecting the descriptions in the Hebrew Bible, such as the chayot in Ezekiel‘s Merkabah vision or the Seraphim of Isaiah.

Famous angels and their tasks:[10]

  • Malachim (translation: messengers), general word for angel
  • Lucifer (translation: light-bearer), angel that challenges god
  • Michael (translation: who is like God), performs God’s kindness
  • Gabriel (translation: the strength of God), performs acts of justice and power
  • Raphael (translation: God Heals), God’s healing force
  • Uriel (translation: God is my light), leads us to destiny
  • Seraphim (translation: the burning ones), sing and praise God
  • Malach HaMavet (translation: the angel of death)
  • Satan (translation: the prosecutor), brings people’s sins before them in the heavenly court
  • Chayot HaKodesh (translation: the holy beasts)
  • Ophanim (translation: arbits) Astrological Influence
  • HaMerkavah (translation: the chariot), transports God’s glory

Christianity

Early Christians inherited Jewish understandings of angels, which in turn may have been partly inherited from the Egyptians.[11] In the early stage, the Christian concept of an angel characterized the angel as a messenger of God. Angels are creatures of good, spirits of love, and messengers of the savior Jesus Christ. Later came identification of individual angelic messengers: Gabriel, Michael, Raphael, Uriel, and Lucifer. Then, in the space of little more than two centuries (from the third to the fifth) the image of angels took on definite characteristics both in theology and in art.[12]

Interaction with angels

An angel comforting Jesus, by Carl Heinrich Bloch, 1865-1879. The New Testament includes a number of interactions and conversations between angels and humans. For instance, three separate cases of angelic interaction deal with the births of John the Baptist and Jesus Christ. In Luke 1:11, an angel appears to Zechariah to inform him that he will have a child despite his old age, thus proclaiming the birth of John the Baptist[18] And in Luke 1:26 the archangel Gabriel visits the Virgin Mary in the Annunciation to foretell the birth of Jesus Christ.[19] Angels then proclaim the birth of Jesus in the Adoration of the shepherds in Luke 2:10.[20] Angels also appear later in the New Testament. In Luke 22:43 an angel comforts Jesus Christ during the Agony in the Garden

Iconography

12th-century icon of the Archangels Michael and Gabriel wearing the loros of the Imperial guards. The earliest known Christian image of an angel, in the Cubicolo dell’Annunziazione in the Catacomb of Priscilla, which is dated to the middle of the third century, is without wings. Representations of angels on sarcophagi and on objects such as lamps and reliquaries of that period also show them without wings,[30] as for example the angel in the Sacrifice of Isaac scene in the Sarcophagus of Junius Bassus. However, the side view photos of the Sarcophagus show winged angelic figures.

The 13th century Persian Islamic Sufi mystic poet Jalal al-Din Muhammad Rumi wrote in his poem Masnavi:

I died as inanimate matter and arose a plant,
I died as a plant and rose again an animal.
I died as an animal and arose a man.
Why then should I fear to become less by dying?
I shall die once again as a man
To rise an angel perfect from head to foot!
Again when I suffer dissolution as an angel,
I shall become what passes the conception of man!
Let me then become non-existent, for non-existence
Sings to me in organ tones, {‘To Him shall we return’}

HINDUISM

In Hinduism, the term deva is sometimes translated as “angel” (besides “god” or “deity”).But essentially deva is not an angel. Instead deva is the embodiment of a natural element with explicit manifestation in physical realms.[49] Angels are usually translated as Gandharvas and apsaras and also as cārana from Sanskrit. See: Srimad Bhagavatam

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I......I am someone forever and ending never
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